Mar 31, 2011

The Budget Battle Begins



HB 4, the bill that was needed to pay the 2011 bills owed by the state of Texas, passes on a vote of 100 to 46.

HB 275, the bill to tap the Rainy Day Fund needed to make up the deficit in the current budget, passes on a vote of 142 to 2.

On Friday, April 1, HB 1, the budget which covers state spending for 2012-113, is set to come up for debate. I've expressed serious reservations about HB 1 and will see if the amendments can help improve the bill.

Mar 29, 2011

Dr. Steven Hotze: Conservative Republicans of Texas Endorses Rep. Peña's Immigration Bill

Today, Dr. Steven Hotze, President of Conservative Republicans of Texas (CRT), has contacted members of the Texas House State Affairs Committee to inform them that CRT has endorsed HB 2757 by Aaron Peña.

HB 2757 by Rep. Aaron Peña would create a guest worker pilot program in Texas.

This bill provides a sensible and thoughtful method to address both illegal immigration and the need for additional workers to provide the necessary labor to meet the growth demands of our state.

The federal government’s refusal to issue adequate work visas for individuals from Mexico, Central and South America, has caused the massive illegal immigration problem we have today. Since the federal government will not deal with the issue, it seems prudent for Texans to set up the Texas Commission on Immigration and Migration to develop a plan which would create a solution to this problem.

Conservative Republicans of Texas endorses HB 2757 and commends Rep. Aaron Peña for his leadership on this issue.

Hispanic Republicans in Texas Seek Constructive Debate on Immigration


Mar 25, 2011

Political Corruption Is An Old Enemy



The Austin Chronicle and others allege that my allegations of political corruption are a recent development somehow connected to my change of parties and the false implication that I am seeking a federal office.

In fact I have been railing against political corruption as a tax on the poor for over ten years. In recent years it has gotten worse. Here is a video from four years ago.

Mar 24, 2011

Press Conference on the Passage of Voter Photo ID

Voter Photo ID Passes Overwhelmingly


Texas House Speaker Joe Straus Passes New Voter ID Law with Help from the Hispanic Republican Conference

Under the leadership of Texas House Speaker Joe Straus, the Texas Legislature has passed a new Voter ID Bill in both houses. After a long week of delays from House Democrats including over 70 amendments today attempting to slow down the bill, the House voted 101-48 to pass the bill.

This legislation has been demanded by the voters of Texas for several years but has been blocked repeatedly by Democrats. In 2007 the House passed a Voter ID bill but the Senate could not. In 2009 the Senate passed a bill but the House could not because of Democrat stalling tactics. Now, with the support of the 30 member Hispanic Republican Conference of Texas and leadership from the LNRC TX, (Latino National Republican Coalition of Texas) it is passed.

The bill now goes to Texas Governor Rick Perry where it will most likely be signed into law. Because the bill was passed with a 2/3rd majority, it will become the law of Texas immediately.

Rep. Allen Fletcher (R-NW Harris County) told me tonight, "This was a fascinating process. We debated 11 hours and saw a lot of ammendments. But more surprisingly were some comments from Democrat legislators, people who are supposed to be our friends and collegues, who came to the mike and called us racists for wanting to begin the process of securing our voting process." Fletcher continued, "Things changed a little bit when some of the Hispanic Republican Legislators stepped to the mike and spoke of things they had witnessed in Democrat precincts in the past."

This bill certainly is not a be all and end all when it comes to voter fraud and its prevention, but it is a good first step. Now, let's do something about mail in ballot fraud and removing dead people and people who have moved out of the county from voter rolls.

Elections mean things and this bill is proof that a Conservative Legislature can get things done. Good Job!

By Bob Price

Mar 23, 2011

Punched In For Floor Debate On Voter ID



The House convenes at 10:00 a.m. Both sides are punched in and ready for debate on the Voter ID legislation.

UPDATE: The Voter ID bill just passed 101-48 in the Texas House late Wednesday. The vote followed 13 hours of debate on over 60 Amendments and 7 Points of Order.

Mar 21, 2011

Voter ID Measure Delayed in House Till Wednesday



The Committee on Calendars kicked (11-4) the Voter ID bill (SB14) back to the floor for Wednesday's calendar. As I said earlier - "A stolen kiss is always the sweetest. Today, unfortunately they stole it from their sister."

The story.

Mar 20, 2011

COMMON-SENSE IMMIGRATION TALK


By RUBEN NAVARRETTE JR.

SAN DIEGO -- When he changed parties a few months ago, Texas state Rep. Aaron Pena made waves. Now, as he tries to take a grown-up approach to the immigration issue, the Democrat-turned-Republican is making sense.

As when Pena told me, "Part of the reason I'm doing this is to get the public to stop talking out of both sides of their mouths. We're responsible because we offer (illegal immigrants) jobs."

Or when he surveyed the array of immigration-related bills in the Texas Legislature and declared, "A lot of what's out there is driven by racial or ethnic animosity."

And when he suggested, "Part of the reason that Washington ignores the issue is because Americans haven't decided what they want."

As someone who lived in Texas for five years, I can attest that making sense is not something lawmakers in the Lone Star State do much of when it comes to immigration. Pena has the benefit of being from the real world of the Rio Grande Valley, where common sense is practically a natural resource.

Americans never seem to have enough common sense on hand when we talk about immigration. If we did, Texans might be able to reconcile the contradiction of boasting that their state is, according to the 2010 Census, the fastest growing in the country while not acknowledging that one of the factors driving that positive trend is immigration.

There are even greater contradictions when it comes to the part of the immigration debate that has captured Pena's attention: guest workers.

First, let's clarify our terms. A "guest worker" is not someone who participates in what the George W. Bush administration proposed -- a massive regularization of status for millions of undocumented individuals who are already living in the United States. Nor is it what the Republican-controlled Utah Legislature recently set in motion by passing a bill that would issue a two-year work permit to illegal immigrants who prove that they have been living and working in the state, can pass a criminal background check, and pay fines of up to $2,500.

You can call this arrangement whatever you like -- "amnesty," "earned legal status," etc. Just don't call it a guest worker program. That's not what it is because the people who would be impacted are already here.

By contrast, guest workers are temporary foreign laborers who are brought into the United States -- perhaps 200,000 per year -- to work for a specific industry. When the agreement expires, they're supposed to go home.

The first U.S. president to rely on foreign workers was Abraham Lincoln. Industries were facing labor shortages during the Civil War and, at Lincoln's urging, Congress passed in 1864 the Act to Encourage Immigration. The bill allowed employers to recruit foreign workers and pay their way to America.

That's just what the doctor ordered for Texas, Pena believes. He has filed a bill that would create something called the Texas Commission on Immigration and Migration. The commission would be charged with exploring the ins and outs of implementing a guest worker program in the state.

"It's a stopgap measure," Pena explained, "until the feds get their act together. I'd rather have this than some of the draconian stuff being discussed around the country. I wanted to look for something pragmatic."

Pena was emphatic that, under his bill, those illegal immigrants currently residing in Texas would not be eligible to participate in the program unless they first went back home.

"Otherwise," he said, "you're telling people it's OK if they cut in line."

Still, the contradictions over guest workers are glaring and numerous. Americans act like they don't want immigrants around -- except when they do. They want to get rid of foreigners -- except when they want to bring more in. They complain about how immigrants are changing the culture -- then they set the stage for even more changes by importing more people. Finally, they take exception to the idea that there are jobs they won't do -- then they bring in foreign workers to do precisely those kinds of jobs.

This must be what Pena meant when he said that Americans haven't decided what we want from the immigration system. Every time you hear about politicians trying to bring more guest workers into the United States, you have to ask: Is the problem that we have too many foreign laborers or not enough?

Utah said, "Not enough." So Texas, what say y'all?

Ruben Navarrette's e-mail address is ruben@rubennavarrette.com.

Mar 15, 2011

Perry Chats With Facebook's Randi Zuckerberg



Texas Governor Perry talked with Randi Zuckerberg, sister of Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg, in an interview live streamed from the social networking company's new Austin office. Facebook Live is partnering with Live Stream from SXSW in interviewing a number of interesting personalities at the event.

The story.

Mar 12, 2011

Teachers Fired Up at Capitol



"Thousands of teachers, parents and school employees massed on the grounds of the State Capitol on Saturday to protest nearly $10 billion in proposed education cuts threatening lay-offs and program reductions at schools across the state."

Read more of the Star-Telegram story here.

The photo above by @opsimath was taken out of a capitol window.

Henry Cisneros and the Last 30 Years

New Day Rising: Henry Cisneros on the Last 30 Years from texastribune on Vimeo.

Mar 11, 2011

If You're Not From The District ...



Friday is the bill filing deadline, if you're not from the district, pass us by if you want us to file your late bills.

Mar 10, 2011

Ag. Comm. Todd Staples, Rep. Peña and Aliseda on Border Security



In an effort to further highlight the need for enhanced border security, Agriculture Commissioner Todd Staples, state Rep. Aaron Peña and state Rep. Jose Aliseda held a press conference Thursday at the Texas State Capitol and cited the latest brutal attack on a Texas rancher by suspected drug cartel members.

The attack took place Sunday in Webb County and involved an exchange of gunfire between a ranch foreman, who returned fire in self-defense after being shot at by 5 suspects who appeared to be running drugs on ranch property. The foreman sustained injuries from shattered glass as a result of incoming bullets.

”American citizens are being attacked, threatened and intimidated on their home soil,” Staples said. “It’s time for the federal government to increase enforcement efforts to help Texas fight this growing war. When criminals enter the United States and harm or threaten the families of our fellow citizens, they should be met and defeated by the fullest force of our government.”

“In the Rio Grande Valley, trade is extremely important because it means jobs for Texans,” Peña said. “We are thankful for the positive impact we have on the Texas economy, but to suggest violence of the nature that is taking place against our farmers and ranchers is not happening or even worse, is acceptable, is to live in a fairy tale world.”

With Texas farmers and ranchers playing a critical role in supplying our nation’s food, Staples recently unveiled ProtectYourTexasBorder.com in response to comments from federal officials undermining the real and present impact of Mexican drug cartel violence on American soil. The site profiles the harrowing true stories of farmers, ranchers and other citizens who deal daily with intimidation, trespassing, drug runners and property damage.

Staples will use the site as a tool to implore the federal government to provide the resources Texas needs to secure its border.

“Our farmers and ranchers along the Rio Grande are caught in the middle of a border war that affects every citizen of our nation,” Staples said. “A threat to our food supply is a threat to our homeland security. Texas stands ready to fight these terrorists and protect our residents, but we must have increased federal support to secure our borders, defeat our enemies and safeguard our national food supply. As providers of the safest, most abundant and most affordable food supply in the world, Texas farmers and ranchers deserve the protection of our federal government.”

Through video interviews, news stories and photographs collected with help from the Texas Farm Bureau and Texas and Southwestern Cattle Raisers Association, ProtectYourTexasBorder.com gives visitors an understanding of the realities of our state’s border war, and how their food depends on safe passage through Texas border cities in order to reach the entire U.S.

TSCRA Special Ranger Roland Garcia, who covers the counties of District 29 along the Texas-Mexico line, played an integral role in the campaign and to giving a voice to those facing border hardships. One such action was to initiate a meeting between Staples and border ranchers, farmers and citizens. You can watch Garcia’s video about border life at protectyourTexasborder.com by navigating to the “Front Line” section of the website and scrolling down the list of videos.

Mar 9, 2011

HB 2757 - Rep. Peña's Guest-Worker Bill



REPRESENTATIVE PEÑA FILES COMPREHENSIVE GUEST WORKER BILL
Legislation Follows Successful Utah Model


AUSTIN - State Representative Aaron Peña has filed legislation to create the Texas Commission on Immigration and Migration to explore the implementation of a guest-worker program in the State of Texas. HB 2757 is modeled after legislation that has successfully passed the Republican dominated Utah legislature. The bill received bi-partisan support, passing unanimously in the House and with one dissenting vote in the Senate.

"The federal government has utterly failed to address comprehensive immigration reform," said Rep. Peña. “They have passed the buck and state legislatures all across the nation are responding. The myriad of bills filed in the Texas House are stop gap measures. They reflect a high level of frustration of the federal government’s inability to offer leadership or practical solutions on the issue of illegal immigration. This is without a doubt a federal issue but where Washington fails, Texans are demanding a Texas response. This is a good start.”

The critical component of the bill would explore the possibility of creating a guest-worker pilot program which would be crafted under current federal worker visa guidelines. Authority would be granted to the governor to partner with a Mexican state to identify and qualify potential workers. Businesses in Texas would be critical in identifying needs and would be necessary to participate in the program. An advisory committee would be created to study the process and results of the program.

“The guest worker program is designed to stem the flow of illegal immigration and fill a need for workers in critical business and industry in Texas,” said Rep. Peña. “The work of the commission is just as important in studying and recommending how to address the issue of illegal immigration in a thoughtful, orderly and lawful way.”

The commission will consist of 26 members and will be made up of legislators, the general public and executive officers of the state including the office of the Governor, the Lt. Governor, the Attorney General, the Commissioner of Agriculture and others. The commission will conduct a thorough review of the economic, legal, cultural, and educational impact of illegal immigration on our communities. It will be tasked to develop a comprehensive, coordinated, and sustainable state plan to address immigration and the use of migrant workers in the state. The commission will be asked to make legislative recommendations to the Governor and the legislature.

“This legislation is one facet in a multifaceted approach that Texas needs to take until the federal government has the courage and will to address the problem,” said Representative Peña. “The polarized and inflamed rhetoric is not a solution and I would hope that this issue is seriously addressed. These concepts have wide spread support and are worthy of our serious consideration.”

Mar 8, 2011

Voter Integrity Bills I Filed Today, March 8, 2011

Voter ID passes TX House committee: kxan.com


HB2585

Background: Currently the Texas Election Code provides that if a person is in possession of one to nine ballots, the crime is a Class B Misdemeanor; if a person is in possession of ten to nineteen ballots, the crime is a Class A Misdemeanor; and if a person is in possession of 20 or more ballots, the crime is a state jail felony.

When conducting election fraud investigations, they must actually find at least 20 ballots in the hand of a vote harvester at one time to charge them with a felony. It does not matter if they find them with nine ballots for 30 days in a row, we are still unable to charge them with a felony according to the current law.

Allowing the aggregation of the number of ballots found pursuant to one scheme regardless of when they were obtained will allow prosecutors more flexibility when prosecuting these cases.

Existing legislation that would be amended or changed includes Election Code, Chapter 86, Subchapter J, to add Section 86.006.
Purpose: This bill will increase penalties for vote harvesters in possession of mail-in ballots.

HB2586

Background: Currently under the Texas Election Code 13.07, a person commits an offense “if the person knowingly makes a false statement or requests, commands, or attempts to induce another person to make a false statement on a registration application.” An offense is a class B misdemeanor. This is a serious offense that results in illegal votes being cast by ineligible voters. Votes from ineligible voters, including convicted felons on probation, non-residents of the county or municipality, and non-citizens of the United States are being harvested across the State. State Jail Felony is the appropriate penalty class for this offense. This change would put the TEC in line with Penal Code 37.10 which provides that if actor’s intent was to defraud or harm another by falsifying a governmental record, the offense is a State Jail Felony.

Existing legislation that would be amended or changed includes Election Code, Chapter 13, Subchapter (a) (b) (c), to amend Section 13.07.

Purpose: This bill will adjust the penalty range for making false statements on a voter registration form and mail in ballots.

HB2587

Background: Over the last few years, many reports of voter fraud, particularly related to voter intimidation, have been reported in the Rio Grande Valley area. Instances of voter-assistance workers going above and beyond their call to aid voters has caused many to inadvertently vote for a candidate which they did not want to vote for, and in some cases has caused voters to avoid the polls altogether in order to avoid the intimidating nature of some voter-assistance workers.

Various reports from local media outlets have documented these concerns, most notably the recent election in Mercedes for the position of mayor. Reports of voter intimidation, including one poll worker "assisting" over 200 people in a single day contributed to the circumstances which prompted this legislation to be filed.

Existing legislation that would be amended or changed includes Election Code, SECTION 1, Section 64.032 and Election Code, SECTION 2, Subchapter B, Chapter 64 to add Section 64.0325, providing a criminal penalty.

Purpose: The purpose of this legislation is to further prevent voter intimidation and voter fraud in affected regions of Texas.

HB2588

Background: Currently, statute allows a watcher to be present if a voter is assisted by an election officer. This would allow a watcher to be present if another voter assistant is present to assist the voter.

This bill would amend Section 33.057, Texas Election Code.

Purpose: The purpose of this legislation is to further prevent voter intimidation and voter fraud in affected regions of Texas.

HB2589

Background: As it stands, there is no penalty for a deputy voter registrar if he or she does not turn in voter registration applications. This has developed into a tactic used by political parties to prevent eligible citizens from voting in certain elections and should be recognized as tampering with the workings and validity of local elections.

In accordance with the recent effort to curb intentional voter fraud in the State of Texas, this bill seeks to eliminate known instances in which a voter registrar or deputy voter registrar registers an eligible citizen and intentionally does not deliver the voter registration application to the voter registrar with the specific intent to prevent the aforementioned citizen to participate in an election.

Existing legislation that would be amended or changed with this bill includes Election Code, Sections 13.043(b) and 13.043(c).

Purpose: The purpose of this legislation is to further prevent voter intimidation and voter fraud in affected regions of Texas.

HB2590

Background: Currently, a local registrar must file a copy of each birth and death certificate with the commissioner’s court or the county auditor and DPS does not invalidate a driver's license due to the death of the license holder. The license will become invalid after it expires.

Existing legislation that would be amended or changed with this bill includes Election Code, Section 16.001 (c); Health and Safety Code Section 191.030; Health and Safety Code Section 191.030 (a-1); Transportation Code section 521.007, Subchapter A, Chapter 521, and Transportation Code section 522.008, Subchapter A, Chapter 522.

Purpose: This amendment would require the local registrar to file the same information with the Secretary of State (SOS) and Department of Public Safety (DPS). In addition, the SOS and DPS would be required to use that information to update the voter rolls and the Texas Drivers License. Also, this amendment would require DPS to cancel a TDL within 5 days of receiving notice from either the Texas Vital Statistics or a local registrar that the holder of the Texas Drivers License has died.

Voter Integrity Bills I Filed March 2, 2011

Voter ID passes TX House committee: kxan.com


HB304
First Voter Integrity Bill filed November 16, 2010

Background: Over the last few years, many reports of voter fraud, particularly related to voter intimidation, have been reported in the Rio Grande Valley area. Instances of voter-assistance workers going above and beyond their call to aid voters has caused many to inadvertently vote for a candidate which they did not want to vote for, and in some cases has caused voters to avoid the polls altogether in order to avoid the intimidating nature of some voter-assistance workers.

Various reports from local media outlets have documented these concerns, most notably the recent election in Mercedes for the position of mayor. Reports of voter intimidation, including one poll worker "assisting" over 200 people in a single day contributed to the circumstances which prompted this legislation to be filed.

Existing legislation that would be amended or changed includes Election Code, SECTION 1, Section 64.032 and Election Code, SECTION 2, Subchapter B, Chapter 64 to add Section 64.0325

Purpose: The purpose of this legislation is to further prevent voter intimidation and voter fraud in affected regions of Texas.

HB2050

Background: Instances in which a poll watcher or group of poll watchers wishes to report practices of voter intimidation or voter fraud have been reported, however these respective individuals were unable to properly document the instances of fraud as they were banned from being in the possession of a recording device or cell phone. This bill would allow for recording devices to be used, only in the situation where one needed to record instances of voter fraud or intimidation.

Existing legislation that would be amended or changed includes Election Code, Section 33.006(b) and Election Code, Section 61.014(d). The bill also calls for Election Code, Section 33.051(c) to be repealed.

Purpose: The purpose of this legislation is to further prevent voter intimidation and voter fraud in affected regions of Texas.

HB2051

Background: This bill would provide further protection against voter fraud by requiring voter assistants to take a legal oath when assisting a voter. Currently there is no such legal protection, and this would further protect against voter intimidation and fraud in these instances.

Existing legislation that would be amended or changed includes Election Code, Section 64.034.

Purpose: The purpose of this legislation is to further prevent voter intimidation and voter fraud in affected regions of Texas.

HB2052

Background: In several regions of the state, reports of deceased individuals having voted in elections have arisen. This is accomplished by individuals or organizations, aiming to skew the results of a particular election, harvesting information related to the deaths of certain individuals. This information is then used to obtain materials (utility bill, etc.) related to the identity of the deceased individual, which is then easily presented by someone else at a polling location in order to vote in their name.

Existing legislation that would be amended or changed includes Election Code, Section 16.001(c).

Purpose: The purpose of this legislation is to further prevent voter intimidation and voter fraud in affected regions of Texas.

HB2053

Background: In addition to rampant voter fraud in certain areas of Texas, some poll watchers have also been utilized by many local entities to aid and abet fraudulent voting practices. As it stands, felons are ineligible to serve as poll watchers, presumably based on their previous conduct. Sensibly, it also makes good policy to make ineligible those who have a previous history of tampering with elections, which is the goal of this bill.

Existing legislation that would be amended or changed includes Election Code, Section 33.035.

Purpose: The purpose of this legislation is to further prevent voter intimidation and voter fraud in affected regions of Texas.

HB2054

Background: In the past, there have been several problems with elections administrators across the state not being able to properly execute their duties or being unduly influenced by those not involved in the legal election process. This bill seeks to add to the requirements of the position of Elections Administrator that the said individual seeking the position must be a graduate from a 4-year college or university as to further prevent instances of undue influence on elections administrators.

Existing legislation that would be amended or changed includes Election Code, Section 31.034.

Purpose: The purpose of this legislation is to further prevent voter intimidation and voter fraud in affected regions of Texas.

HB2055

Background: The legislation being filed would allow counties in Texas to administer their own elections in a manner which is different from current practice. This bill seeks to streamline the voting process by allowing a county to offer countywide polling locations. A voter could vote in any polling location in the county regardless of their precinct. The voting system would recognize the specific voter and the ballot would match their precincts.


Existing legislation which would be amended or changed includes Election Code, Section 43.007.

Purpose: The purpose of this bill is to streamline the voting process, making voting more accessible to voters.

HB2056

Background: This bill would require the early voting clerk to alert an administrator who represents a particular location that his or her polling location will not be used in the upcoming election cycle, if it is planned to not be used and was used in the previous election cycle.

Existing legislation that would be amended or changed includes Election Code, Chapter 85, Subchapter A, to add Section 85.0041.

Purpose: The purpose of this legislation is to close up potential inconsistencies with other filed legislation, particularly related to County Elections administration.

HB2057

Background: As it stands, there is currently no law which exists to prosecute an individual or individuals which conspire to interfere with an election. In accordance with the current trend to curb voter fraud and voter intimidation in the State of Texas, this bill will aim to provide a criminal penalty to anyone who engages in these types of acts.

Existing legislation that would be amended or changed includes Penal Code, Section 71.02(a).

Purpose: The purpose of this legislation is to further prevent voter intimidation and voter fraud in affected regions of Texas.

HB2058

Background: While many instances of voter fraud are committed through measures which involve the physical attendance of the perpetrator, much fraud is similarly committed through editing or falsifying mail-in ballots. This has caused several instances in which the intent of the voter is not always necessarily carried out by their ballot through measures of occasional intimidation or blatant falsification, stemming from those aiding the voter or the voters themselves.

Existing legislation that would be amended or changed includes Election Code, Section 84.003(b).

Purpose: The purpose of this legislation is to further prevent voter intimidation and voter fraud in affected regions of Texas.

HB2059

Background: As it stands, there is no penalty for a deputy voter registrar if he or she does not turn in voter registration applications. This has developed into a tactic used by political parties to prevent eligible citizens from voting in certain elections and should be recognized as tampering with the workings and validity of local elections.

In accordance with the recent effort to curb intentional voter fraud in the State of Texas, this bill seeks to eliminate known instances in which a voter registrar or deputy voter registrar registers an eligible citizen and intentionally does not deliver the voter registration application to the voter registrar with the specific intent to prevent the aforementioned citizen to participate in an election.

Existing legislation that would be amended or changed with this bill includes Election Code, Sections 13.043(b) and 13.043(c).

Purpose: The purpose of this legislation is to further prevent voter intimidation and voter fraud in affected regions of Texas.

HB2060

Background: In order to prevent any future disputes of the alleged misconduct of a state elections inspector, this bill seeks to keep the identity of the aforementioned elections inspector private until the day after the election. This is to ensure that the inspector is not subject to political or other influences during the highly-heated lead-up to Election Day.

Existing legislation that would be amended or changed includes Election Code, Sections 34.001 (a) and (c), and Election Code, Chapter 34 by adding Section 34.006.

Purpose: The purpose of this legislation is to further prevent voter intimidation and voter fraud in affected regions of Texas.


HB2061


Background: In several regions of the state, reports of deceased individuals having voted in elections have arisen. This is accomplished by individuals or organizations, aiming to skew the results of a particular election, harvesting information related to the deaths of certain individuals. This information is then used to obtain materials (utility bill, etc.) related to the identity of the deceased individual, which is then easily presented by someone else at a polling location in order to vote in their name. This bill would require the local registrar to report any deaths, births, or such to the state registrar, thus allowing for a more transparent voting system when cross-referenced by the Secretary of State.

Existing legislation that would be amended or changed includes Health and Safety Code, Section 191.024(a).

Purpose: The purpose of this legislation is to further prevent voter intimidation and voter fraud in affected regions of Texas.

Edinburg Day a Big Success